Chai Spice Balm

One of my favourite balms for fall.

Individually infuse organic cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, clove and madagascar vanilla beans in sweet almond oil or carrier oil of choice, blend together and add beeswax.

A warming lip balm, hydrating  hand and cuticle balm or exotic, spicy natural perfume.

Spices can easily be infused together to simplify the process.

Separate infusions allow you to make further creations like cinnamon oil and cocoa butter for a Valentine’s foot rub.

Or use the clove oil for a sore muscle and joint rub.

Infused in food grade organic carrier oils such as olive or sesame, clove oil can be used as a mouthwash or to soothe toothaches.

Cardamom provides an aromatic base for natural perfume.  Add a small amount of essential oils of sandalwood and bergamot for a warm citrus blend or try neroli or rosewood.

Blend cardamom with the vanilla infusion for a simple, exotic scent.

A hint of lavender essential oil added to the vanilla infusion creates the epitome of calm and relaxation.  A delicious massage blend for men and women.  Vanilla beans infuse easily, imparting a full scent with a few beans.  Follow the steps for vanilla infused oil and balm.  The balm recipe works for the chai spice blend as well.  Many spices require more active methods of infusion than herbs.  Heat baths or grinding of the spices assist with a deep, rich scent.

In India, the origin of chai, unique family recipes are handed down through generations.  Explore your spice rack for your signature chai blend.

Warm your skin, senses and soul this autumn with chai spice.

Stephanie Hrehirchuk
atONE Holistic Living

Comments

  1. Sounds lovely! I would like to -no- I’m going to experiment with chai,chai-latte and now this balm aswell, thanks for sharing :)

  2. You are welcome wildcraft diva!
    Enjoy your experiments. Chai is divine. Some recipes include star anise, pepper or fennel. Have fun and create your own signature blend :)

    Thank you for your comment.
    All the best,
    Stephanie

  3. I wonder what your ratio of oil to beeswax was? Thanks for the post!

  4. Basic salve ratio is about 4 oz of infused oil to 1/4 oz melted wax. I like to use more wax for a firmer balm. Add your wax and drip a drop or two on your skin, it will cool on contact, giving you an idea of the consistency. Or simply turn the spoon over and watch it cool on the back. Add more wax if it’s not firm enough for you.

    Making beeswax balms intimidated me the most. I had every graduated cylinder and measuring cup in use. Messy and ineffective! Once I crafted a couple, it became one of the simplest and most fun herbal creations. Now I make balms out of practically everything, and rarely measure. It doesn’t take long to get a feel for it and the beeswax is pretty forgiving to work with.

    Thanks Zendoula.
    Enjoy your balm!
    Stephanie

  5. How long do you infuse the oil with the chai spices for? Over low heat? Wonder if essential oils could also be used?

  6. Hi Jules,
    You can play with essential oils to create a chai aroma. The plants infuse an aroma I find easier to work with as they seem to blend naturally without too much thought to quantity of each or one scent overpowering the other. The herbal infusions also have different properties than essential oil infusions and you can see it in the oil’s viscosity. Play with a method and blend that feels good to you. Use your instincts and creative license to allow a blend to emerge.

    You can heat the spices in oil in a hot water bath or double boiler, not too high of heat. You can also grind the spices, pour in your oil, cap tightly and allow to infuse until mid December, just in time for Christmas balm making. If they aren’t strong enough, pop them in a water bath to help them out. Grinding the spices will allow them to disperse their scent and properties more effectively, however, you will need a good cheesecloth or method of separating the spices from the oil once done. Try 30-60 minutes in the water bath.

    This is a warming balm that releases its subtle spicy scent as it melts onto the skin. If you forgo the beeswax, the oil is lovely for massage, body oil or bath.

    Have fun Jules and thanks for the comment.
    Stephanie

  7. HELLO STEPHANIE,
    THANK-YOU FOR SHARING. COULD YOU PLEASE GIVE US THE EXACT AMOUNTS? I AM NEW AT THIS. ALSO, WHAT WOULD BE A GOOD STARTER KIT FOR A NEWBIE? I HAVE A WHOLE BAG OF CHAI TEA FROM AN INDIAN LADY BUT CAN’T REMEMBER HOW TO MAKE IT. I LOVE THE TEA IN THE INDIAN RESTAURANTS.
    BETTY

  8. Hi Betty.
    Your chai tea sounds special and I would start small, perhaps 1/4 to 1/3 cup of chai tea spice blend and 1 cup of oil. Use an oil without a strong aroma or it will overpower your beautiful spices. Place them in a double boiler or hot water bath if you are wanting to make this the same day and not let them sit for several weeks.

    Do NOT allow any water to sneak into your oil. Gently heat the oil, stirring and slightly grinding the spices as you heat, releasing their natural oils. Keep this up until you can smell the aroma of the chai in the oil. Remove a few drops of oil and let it cool slightly on a spoon before trying on your skin. If you are happy with the scent, you can remove the oil from the heat, careful not to get water into your oil, cool it a little and strain the herbs through a cheesecloth, muslin or coffee filter.

    Place the warm oil back into the double boiler and add your beeswax. You can keep some oil aside to use as a body oil. Basic salve recipe is 4 oz infused oil to 1/4 oz wax. I like to use a bit more wax… 120ml oil to 20ml wax, for a harder balm. If you melt your wax separately, it will be difficult to measure as it cools so quickly you will not have time to pour it into any measuring device. My best advice is to take a heaping tbsp of solid beeswax per 100-120ml of infused oil.

    Stir in the beeswax until melted and test a drop on your skin, as it cools you’ll know if it’s too soft, too hard or just right. Too soft – add more wax. Too hard, add more oil.
    Good luck Betty!

    If you’d like a nice cup of chai while you make your balm, simmer a couple tsps of your lovely tea in a small pot of water, perhaps 2 cups, for 20 minutes or so. Add 1/2 cup of milk of choice and heat a few minutes more before straining the spices. Add honey to your mug, pour your chai over top, stir and enjoy.
    Stephanie

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